links for 2008-09-21

  • (tags: function draw)
  • Mazes in general (and hence algorithms to create Mazes) can be organized along seven different classifications. These are: Dimension, Hyperdimension, Topology, Tessellation, Routing, Texture, and Focus. A Maze can take one item from each of the classes in any combination.
  • (tags: glpk)
  • 14 Nov 2006

    The GNU Linear Programming Kit (GLPK) is a powerful, proven tool for solving numeric problems with multiple constraints. This article, the third in a three-part series, uses GLPK and the glpsol client utility with the GNU MathProg language to solve a perfume production problem and a basketball lineup problem.

    This article is the third in a three-part series on using the GNU Linear Programming Kit. For an introduction to GLPK, read the first installment in the series, "The GNU Linear Programming Kit, Part 1: Introduction to linear optimization."

    [All company and product names given in the example problems are fictional. -Ed.]

  • 07 Sep 2006

    This article continues the series on using the GNU Linear Programming Kit and the glpsol client utility with the GNU MathProg language. In this installment, a diet problem shows you how to formulate a simple multi-variable and declare bidimensional parameters. A post office resource allocation problem then introduces MathProg expressions and integer-only decision variables.

    This article is the second in a three-part series on the GNU Linear Programming Kit (GLPK). For an introduction to GLPK, read the first installment in the series, "The GNU Linear Programming Kit, Part 1: Introduction to linear optimization."

  • The GNU Linear Programming Kit is a powerful, proven tool for solving numeric problems with multiple constraints. This article introduces GLPK, the glpsol client utility, and the GNU MathProg language to solve the problem of optimizing the operations for Giapetto's Woodcarving, Inc., a fictional toy manufacturer.

    Introduction

    "Linear programming is a tool for solving optimization problems. In 1947, George Dantzig developed an efficient method, the simplex algorithm, for solving linear programming problems. Since the development of the simplex algorithm, linear programming has been used to solve optimization problems in industries as diverse as banking, education, forestry, petroleum, and trucking. In a survey of Fortune 500 firms, 85% of the respondents said they had used linear programming."

    From Operations Research: Applications and Algorithms, 4th Edition, by Wayne L. Winston (Thomson, 2004); see Resources below for a link.

  • (tags: cdargs)
  • (tags: steiner)
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